New recipes

12 Travel Destinations for Every Food Lover’s Bucket List

12 Travel Destinations for Every Food Lover’s Bucket List



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Love food? Love travel? This is the ultimate list for you

We’ve rounded up 12 areas that should be a shoe-in for any food-lover’s travel bucket list. Check them out here.

There are more types of cuisine than there are countries in the world (and the latter number approaches 200). Each type of food is steeped in history, culture, and, for individuals who’ve grown up with it, memories of family, friends, and specific events.

Every world traveler (and food-lover) has a list of dream destinations, even if they’ve never been written down, and we’ve rounded up 12 areas that should be a shoe-in for any food-lover’s travel bucket list. Our grouping highlights areas around the world, like Zagreb’s sarma, or cabbage leaves filled with ground meat, and Kyoto’s kaiseki ryori, a traditional dining style. Take a look, and start adding these food-centric cities and regions to your mental bucket list.

Additional reporting by Colman Andrews.


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!


10 Museums That Need To Be On Every Food Lover's Bucket List

George Bernard Shaw had rightly said, "there is no love sincerer than the love of food." From spicy Chicken Tikka to exquisite Soupe à L'oignon and decadent chocolate cakes, what's not to like?

And if you're someone who fancies exploring the rich history behind some of the world's most popular foods (while munching on delish food samples) then look no further than a food museum.

Check out these popular museums that are a must-visit for all food lovers who have a hunger for travel:

1. Deutsches Currywurst Museum, Berlin, Germany

Currywurst is a German fast-food favorite. The quirky museum offers a sneak-peek into the interesting history of the fried sausage dish. You can listen to the story of its origin on a sausage-shaped telephone while sitting on a sausage-shaped couch. What's more, you can play currywurst-themed video games, prepare a virtual sausage using interactive exhibits, take some selfies behind a mock-currywurst bar, and of course, scarf down a few spicy samples.

2. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum, Yokohama, Japan

The museum's first floor is dedicated to the history of the popular noodle dish. While the basement floors feature a beautiful, detailed replica of Tokyo's old town, Shitamachi. It also includes a recreation of the first ramen dish ever eaten back in the 17th century. The lower floor also houses nine different restaurants which serve ramen bowls from different regions of Japan. According to the museum, there are at least 30 distinct, regional varieties of ramen in Japan. Meanwhile, you can also create your own brand of ramen at the 'My Ramen' booth in the museum's shop. How do you say "take me there" in Japanese?

3. Pizza Brain, Philadelphia, United States

Curated by pizza aficionado Brian Dwyer, this quirky museum houses the world's largest collection of pizza paraphernalia. And if browsing through all those pizza-themed books, vinyl records and action figures makes you a little peckish, you can head over to the attached pizzeria to gorg on a few slices.

4. Le musée du chocolat, Paris, France

"All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt," wrote famous American cartoonist, Charles M. Schulz. He couldn't be more accurate! If you're a chocolate enthusiast like me, then the chocolate museum of Paris definitely needs to be on your bucket list. Also known as Choco-Story, the museum has over 1,000 exhibits that cover everything from the origin of cocoa beans to commercialization of chocolate-making. Moreover, you can also taste delicious treats made by expert chocolatiers or create one yourself at one of the workshops. Excusez-moi, s'il vous plait, need to book some tickets!

5. Frietmuseum, Bruges, Belgium

Located in northwest Belgium, it is the world's only museum dedicated to French fries. On its ground floor, visitors can learn about the interesting history of potatoes which originated in Peru over 10,000 years ago. The first floor is dedicated to the history of French fries and how they came to Belgium. According to historians, the Belgians have been eating fried potatoes since the late 1600s. Once the tour is over, you can head over to the medieval cellars located on the basement floor to chomp on some free samples!

6. Museum Kimchikan, Seoul, South Korea

Made with fermented vegetables, Kimchi is a staple in Korean cuisine. The museum's aim is to educate visitors about the making of this traditional side dish. You can check out a special exhibition that focuses on various regional varieties of kimchi. Other than that, visitors can use a microscope to observe the lactic acid bacteria that makes the pickled dish nutritious. Additionally, you can treat yourself to a wide range of Kimchi in a unique tasting room.

7. The Herring Era Museum, Siglufjörður, Iceland

Icelanders take their fish very seriously. And the Herring Era Museum proves just that. Located in a small fishing town, it's the largest maritime museum of the Nordic nation. It illustrates the importance of Iceland's herring industry and it's role in the country's history. Good herring seasons during the great depression of the 1930s, "played a role in enabling the country to achieve freedom in 1944, following five centuries of Danish domination," explains the museum website. The museum boasts of a great number of artifacts, including heavy machinery, boats, motors, anchors and smaller hand tools that were used in fishing and processing of the fish. In addition, visitors can buy quirky merch from its souvenir shop like handmade barrel tubs and pins that look like vintage barrel stencils.

8. The National Mustard Museum, Middleton, United States

Complete with assorted mustard memorabilia, interactive food quizzes and a tasting bar, this place is every mustard enthusiast's paradise. The star attraction is the museum's Great Wall of Mustard – an extensive collection of over 5,600 types of prepared mustard from all 50 U.S states and more than 70 countries. And oh, did I mention that the entry is free?

9. The Cheese Museum, Alkmaar, Netherlands

Located on the upper floors of Alkmaar's Cheese Weigh House, the museum focuses on the history of two most famous Dutch cheeses: Edam and Gouda. It houses a vast collection of cheese-related tools along with interactive exhibits and presentations for kids. If you happen to visit Alkmaar between April and September, don't forget to check out its world-famous cheese market.

10. Jell-O Gallery Museum, New York, United States

The museum is located in the town of LeRoy which is also the birthplace of Jell-O, the wobbly gelatin dessert. Decked with recipe books, vintage advertisements, molds and other memorabilia, a visit to this fascinating museum is bound to make you hungry. Also, don't forget to check out their quirky souvenir shop that sells everything from Jell-O plush toys and pencils to license plates and color changing cups.

Now book the tickets and pack your bags, it's time to take your taste buds on an adventurous journey!