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The 12 Reasons Salt Is Actually Good for You

The 12 Reasons Salt Is Actually Good for You



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Living a low-sodium lifestyle could actually be detrimental to your health

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It's been condemned for a long time, but humans need salt to stay healthy.

Salt has been abhorred by the health food industry for ages — the simple compound sodium chloride, which occurs naturally in many foods, was rumored to be linked to weight gain, extreme thirst, and heightened blood pressure.

Find The 12 Reasons Salt Is Actually Good for You here.

Salt-free pretzels made a comeback in grandparents’ pantries and “reduced sodium” quickly began to equate to “healthier” in shopper’s minds. Fast food and restaurant chains were scorned for their tendency to add salt to food to make them taste better, accused for trying to induce American consumers with uncontrollable cravings for salty fries and Chinese noodles.

But as it turns out, those cravings may have another cause. The amount of sodium in the average diet has actually stayed consistent for over 50 years — a conclusion that contradicts popular beliefs that the rise of obesity is in part due to a simultaneous rise in sodium intake. People have been effortlessly self-regulating their sodium — until now, when people are purposefully restricting their intake.

Sodium restriction has caused many Americans — athletes in particular — to experience the unsavory side effects of deficiency, such as hormone disruption and fatigue. Those side effects happen when you bar yourself from experiencing the very real, very vital benefits that salt has to offer.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.


9 Reasons Why (the Right Amount of) Coffee Is Good for You

Ah, coffee. Whether you&rsquore cradling a travel mug on your way to work or dashing out after spin class to refuel with a skinny latte, it&rsquos hard to imagine a day without it. The caffeine perks you up, and there&rsquos something incredibly soothing about sipping a steaming cup of joe. But is drinking coffee good for you?

Good news: The case for coffee is stronger than ever. Study after study indicates you could be getting more from your favorite morning beverage than you thought: Coffee is chock full of substances that may help guard against conditions more common in women, including Alzheimer&rsquos disease and heart disease.

&ldquoCaffeine is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about coffee. But coffee also contains antioxidants and other active substances that may reduce internal inflammation and protect against disease,&rdquo says Diane Vizthum, M.S., R.D., research nutritionist for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.