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Linguine with Duck Ragu recipe

Linguine with Duck Ragu recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Pasta
  • Easy pasta

Delectable pasta dish of roasted duck breast ripped into a sensational rich tomato sauce which is stirred through linguine and finished with oregano.

32 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 duck breast fillets
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • For the sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 celery, trimmed and chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 400g can Cirio Chopped Tomatoes
  • 275g (10oz) linguine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh oregano, torn

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:20min ›Ready in:35min

  1. First trim the duck breast and season well on both sides with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place in a non-stick pan, over high heat skin side down and cook until fat is released and skin is golden. Turn over and cook other side crisp. Remove from oven and leave to rest.
  2. Meanwhile, make the sauce. Heat oil in a pan and fry onion, celery and garlic over low heat until soft, but not brown. Add Cirio Chopped Tomatoes and stir well. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook gently to reduce slightly.
  3. Cook linguine in plenty of boiling salted water until just tender (al dente). Drain. Transfer to sauce and stir through. Slice or shred duck breast and add this with chopped oregano to pasta mix. Toss again. Serve immediately.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)

Reviews in English (2)

It was very nice and filling I did use smoked duck breast to add a different taste . Would cook again-17 Jan 2014

Great recipe, everything you could ask for, quick, full of flavour, and simple to cook-18 Jan 2013


Known as gnocchi col sugo di papera in the local dialect, this traditional dish can be found on offer in many trattorias and restaurants in the Marche region. Although this is mostly an autumn/winter dish enjoyed during the cold weather months, ducks are also typical farmyard birds and, therefore, eaten throughout the year.

In Le Marche, they also serve this duck ragu with fregnacce (fazzoletti pasta), tagliatelle or pappardelle pasta ribbons. However, with potato gnocchi is the most common combination. In fact, in a number of towns and villages of the region, they also have annual gnocchi with duck festivals (sagra in Italian). Duck is eaten with pasta or gnocchi in other Italian regions too. Here in Veneto, where I live, bigoli with duck ragu is practically a signature dish.


Bigoli with Duck Ragu from Veneto, Italy

Bigoli with duck ragu is a traditional dish here in Veneto where I live. In fact, if you are visiting the region you are bound to find it on offer in many restaurants. It is also often cooked by the Venetians on holidays or feast days. I have eaten duck ragu many times, but this was my first time cooking it!

I bigoli con l’anatra.

Bigoli is a usually fresh pasta, mostly eaten in Veneto . It‘s made with flour, eggs (often duck eggs), salt, water or milk and sometimes butter. It looks like very thick spaghetti and is about 3-4mm in diameter. Traditionally this pasta was made with a press called a torchio or bigolaro which had to be wound by hand as the pasta dough passed through the holes in the bottom. I have written more about the history of bigoli and the bigolaro in another post.

Traditional bigoli with duck ragu.

Bigoli is most often eaten with various fat-rich sauces, the most well-known bigoli recipe is duck ragu. In the past, the traditional recipe for this ragu involved cooking the pasta in a fatty broth in which a young duck had been boiled. The Venetians then made a sauce with flavored butter and the offal of the duck, which they ate with the bigoli. The duck itself was eaten after.

A bigoli with duck ragu festival!

This duck pasta dish used to be traditionally cooked in September and October during the hunting season. Even today, in the small town of Zane near Vicenza, a ‘bigoli with duck’ festival is held on the first Sunday of October. At the feast, bigoli is first served with duck meat sauce and then the duck is served separately. In keeping with tradition, they also cook the pasta in the duck broth, rather than in water. I’ve never tried it this way but, apparently, this makes the whole dish a lot tastier.

Nowadays many people use ground duck meat to make a sauce very similar to normal meat ragu, but usually without tomatoes. That recipe is, of course, extremely lean and obviously healthier! However, to be honest I feel it’s cheating a bit and doesn’t have the same flavour as other methods of making duck ragu.

Different ways to make the duck ragu!

There are a number of other ways of preparing duck ragu. Some people roast a whole bird, then add the meat to the sauce. Others use only the breast which has been finely chopped and cook it in the sauce. I decided to use duck pieces (2 legs and a breast). A whole quartered duck can be cooked the same way. I browned the duck and then cooked it in the sauce for 2 hours. Once it was ready, I removed the duck, allowed it to cool and then cut the meat into very small pieces. Before returning the meat to the pan, I also skimmed most of the fat from the sauce.

The best duck ragu my hubby has ever eaten!

It turned out to be a long process, although it’s possible to get on with other things whilst the sauce is simmering! However, it was well worth the time spent as it turned out a lot tastier than many of the versions I have eaten made with minced duck or just duck breast. My hubby, who comes from Sicily but has lived in Veneto for more than 30 years, told me it was the best bigoli with duck he’d ever eaten and he’s eaten it many many times! So I’m feeling pretty chuffed right now! Check out this traditional bigoli recipe below and enjoy!

If you make this duck pasta recipe, I’d love to hear how it turns out and if you liked it. Please leave a comment here on the blog or on The Pasta Project Facebook page.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Another delicious bigoli recipe you may like is Bigoli with sausage ragu. Click this link to check it out. Recipe Bigoli with luganega sausage

If you like this recipe you may also like Bigoli with farmyard ragu made with duck, guinea fowl and stewing hen!

(This recipe post was first published in 2017, but has been updated)

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Make the ragu

  • Heat the oil in a 5- to 6-quart Dutch oven or other heavy-duty pot over medium-high heat. Season both sides of the duck legs and thighs with salt and pepper and arrange them in the pot, skin side down. Sear until the skin is browned and crisp, about 7 minutes. Using tongs, turn the legs over and brown the other sides, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the duck to a deep platter. Pour off all but about 1 Tbs. of the rendered fat and discard or save for another use.
  • Reduce the heat to medium low. Put the celery, garlic, onion, carrot, sage, and bay leaf in the pot. Cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables are softened, 7 to 8 minutes.
  • Pour in the wine and increase the heat to high. Cook at a lively simmer for 1 minute and then reduce the heat to medium. Stir in the tomatoes with their juice and 1/2 cup of the broth. Return the duck to the pot and bring the liquid to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium low or low to maintain a gentle simmer. Cover the pot and simmer until the meat is fork-tender, 1-1/2 to 2 hours.
  • Remove the duck from the pot and set aside until cool enough to handle. Meanwhile, skim the excess fat from the top of the sauce with a large spoon. If the sauce seems thin, continue simmering until flavorful and thickened to a saucy consistency.
  • Discard the duck skin and shred the meat. Add the shredded meat to the sauce, along with the other 1/2 cup of broth if the sauce seems too thick. Let the sauce simmer gently for 15 minutes discard the garlic and bay leaf. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook the pasta and serve

  • When ready to serve, bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Cook the pasta until al dente—you want it to still have some bite because it will continue to cook a bit while you’re tossing it with the ragù. Reserve about 1 cup of the cooking water and then drain the pasta. Return the pasta to the pot and toss it with some of the ragù, adding a little cooking water if it seems dry. Serve the pasta with more ragù spooned over the top, garnished with freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, if you like.

Make Ahead Tips

The ragù can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 3 months. Reheat gently before tossing with pasta.

Recipe Notes

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Ingredient Spotlight


Duck Tail Pasta with Creamy Mushroom Ragu

Remove thawed duck leg confit from package. Remove all meat from the duck legs and finely dice.

In a medium sauce pan over medium-high heat, add duck fat and shallots. Cook for about 3-4 minutes or until tender. Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Stir in duck meat, bread crumbs, egg yolks and cheese. Stir until mixture starts to form a ball and sticks together.

Place about a 1/2- to 3/4-inch ball of filling in the center of pasta. Wet edges of pasta with water, fold edges together on the diagonal to form a triangle. Press edges together, making sure to seal well. Position the folded section on the bottom, and the sealed edges on the top portion of the triangle on your work surface. Fold in bottom corners toward the middle and seal with water to form a duck tail. Place duck tails on a wire rack until ready to cook.

In a medium bowl, add chicken broth and dried mushrooms. Let mushrooms soak until softened, about 20 minutes. Strain mushrooms, reserving broth for sauce. Dice mushrooms and reserve until needed.

In a large deep skillet, over medium-high heat, add 4 tablespoons of duck fat and the whole sage leaves. Cook until sage begins to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Remove leaves from pan and place on paper towel to drain, reserving until needed.

Add bacon to pan and cook for 3-4 minutes until bacon begins to brown. Add shallots and onions and cook until softened, about 3-4 more minutes.

Add remaining duck fat, diced porcinis, bellas, salt and pepper to the pan. Cook until mushrooms begin to brown and most of the liquid has evaporated, about 5-7 minutes.

To deglaze, add reserved chicken broth and Marsala wine to pan, scraping all the brown bits that have formed on the bottom. Simmer until 1/2 cup of liquid remains in the pan, about 10 minutes.

Stir in cream and diced sage and cook until sauce thickens, about 3-4 minutes, remove from heat. Check for seasoning, add additional salt, if needed.

In a deep skillet add 3-4 inches of salted water, bring to a low boil. Add duck tails and cook for about 4-5 minutes or until the desired doneness is achieved, cooking in batches, if needed. Cooking in a skillet using this method will help keep duck tails intact while boiling. Strain off water.

To serve, ladle creamy mushroom ragu into the bottom of six pasta bowls. Add six duck tails to each bowl. Garnish with fried sage, diced tomatoes and sprinkle with Manchego cream.


Rabbit ragù with tagliatelle

Valeria Necchio serves up her Grandmother's rabbit ragù recipe with some fresh tagliatelle – the perfect dish for lazy Sundays in the kitchen. This recipe is taken from Veneto: Recipes From an Italian Country Kitchen by Valeria Necchio, published by Faber & Faber. Photography by Valeria Necchio.

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If I could eat tagliatelle with rabbit ragù every week, I would. I don't, but Mum used to, for Great-Grandma Maria was adamant about making it every Sunday as the first course, followed, most likely, by braised rabbit with stir-fried greens. Then again, they did rear their own rabbits.

Rabbits have been farmed for centuries in Veneto, and the tradition continues to this day, with rabbit being widely available in butcher shops and on restaurant menus. Many agriturismi dotting the Venetian countryside serve it, either on its own or, if you're lucky, as part of an always delightful ragù di cortile (a 'courtyard' mixed-meat ragù).

Great-Grandma Maria only used rabbit in her ragù. The sauce started with rabbit meat browning in a glistening puddle of butter and pancetta. It was then wetted by wine and broth and a blushing bit of tomato before being simmered patiently for a good while – long enough for Maria to make a batch of fresh tagliatelle to go with it.

Making fresh pasta was part of the Sunday ritual in rural Veneto. No woman would ever get married, let alone be allowed in the kitchen, if she didn't know how to tame a ball of dough. Maria used to stretch her dough with a rolling pin (baco da taiadele), cut the tagliatelle by hand, and hang them to dry around the kitchen like frilly fringes. No pasta machine in her kitchen.

I wish I could say the same. These days, I not only rely on a pasta machine, but I often depend on a good fresh pasta supplier, too. The rabbit sauce however, has no shortcuts: its therapeutic properties rest in the cooking as much as the eating. Taking a half Sunday to bring it all together seems like a luxury sometimes, but it all feels very worthwhile the moment we sit down to lunch.


Ingredients

  • Ragu
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 4 sprigs thyme
  • 68 grams (1/2 cup) kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 (400-gram/14-ounce) duck legs
  • Some good olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 3 celery ribs, finely chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, finely chopped
  • 340 grams (1 1/2 cups) dry white wine
  • 1 (794-gram/28-ounce) can whole San Marzano tomatoes
  • 35 grams (1 1/4 ounces) 80 to 90 percent dark chocolate, finely grated
  • &nbsp
  • Pasta
  • 300 grams (2 cups plus 3 1/2 tablespoons) Tipo 00 flour
  • 6 large egg yolks
  • 60 grams (1/4 cup) room-temperature water
  • All-purpose flour, for rolling the dough
  • &nbsp
  • A pinch of chili flakes
  • A chunk of Piave Vecchio cheese or parmigiano
  • A handful of parsley leaves, chopped

Duck Ragu

To Prep 15 To Cook 1 hour 45 minutes How easy? It’s so easy. Serves 4 Luv Rating

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Ingredients

4 Luv-a-Duck Roast Duck Legs
3&frasl4 cup Luv-a-Duck Duck Stock
2 tbsp Luv-a-Duck Duck Fat
1 brown onion, diced
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 carrot, diced
1 celery stalk, diced
2 tsp thyme leaves
1&frasl2 cup red wine
400g can chopped tomatoes
2 tbsp tomato paste
375g fettuccine pasta
Shaved Parmesan cheese, to serve

Products used

Method

  1. Heat duck fat in a large heavy base saucepan. Add duck legs in two batches, skin side down, and cook until browned all over. Transfer to a plate.
  2. Add onion, garlic, carrot, celery and thyme and cook for 5 minutes or until starting to brown. Pour in wine and simmer for 2 minutes. Return duck legs to pan. Add tomatoes, tomato paste, stock and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, covered for 1 1&frasl2 hours or until duck falls away easily from the bone. Using tongs, remove the duck legs and roughly shred. Return meat to sauce and discard bones.
  3. Cook pasta in plenty of boiling water until al dente. Serve with duck ragu sauce and shaved Parmesan.

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Products used

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Luv-a-Duck Celebrates 50 Years
In 2018, Luv-a-Duck celebrated 50 years of being an Australian family owned business.

Our Story

Our journey started with a simple love of flavour and family, in Arthur Shoppee's backyard in the 1960's. Today, that same love makes us Australia's leading duck producer.

Employment

Luv-a-Duck is a family owned Australian business that employs people nationally in a variety of roles that assists in the operation of our fully vertically integrated agribusiness. To find out what jobs are available, go to seek.com.au and type in “Luv-a-Duck” under Enter Keyword.

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Ingredients

For the ragu

  • One 5-lb. whole duck
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 3 sprigs thyme
  • 3 sprigs rosemary
  • 10 sage leaves
  • 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, cut into fine dice
  • 1 stalk celery, cut into fine dice
  • 1 carrot, cut into fine dice
  • 1 lb. ground duck breast, including skin
  • 1/2 cup Marsala wine
  • 1 cup white wine
  • One 28-oz. can whole plum tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 Tbs. chopped flat leaf parsley plus 1 sprig
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

For the pasta

  • 5-3/4 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 4 eggs, at room temperature
  • 3 Tbs. unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup whole milk, warmed

Duck Ragu with Fresh Pasta

To Cook 2 hours How easy? It’s so easy. Serves 6 Luv Rating

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More Italian Inspired Recipes

Ingredients

6 Luv-a-Duck, Fresh Duck Legs
1 onion, finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, finely grated
4 sprigs thyme
250ml red wine
400g canned crushed tomatoes
400ml Luv-a-Duck, Duck Stock
1 qty pre-made fresh pasta (refer to our Fresh Pasta recipe)
parmesan, shaved, to garnish
parsley, chopped, to garnish

Products used

Method

  1. Cut duck legs in half at the thigh and drumstick joint.
  2. Heat a large frying pan over a high heat and brown the duck on all sides.
  3. Remove duck from the pan and transfer to a large saucepan. Add onion to frypan and sauté, until golden then add garlic and cook for 2 minutes.
  4. Deglaze the pan with red wine taking care to stand back as the pan may flame.
  5. Add the remaining ingredients to the pan with the wine, season to taste and bring to the boil. Reduce to a rolling simmer and cook duck for approximately 90 minutes, without covering, until the sauce has thickened and the duck is cooked.
  6. Serve with fresh pasta, parmesan and garnish with chopped parsley.

Chef’s Tips

Luv-a-Duck's Slow Cooked Duck Legs can also be used in this recipe instead of Fresh Duck Legs

LUV to Help You

Products used

Log-in or Register using My Cookbook to save recipes.

Reviews

Sorry, no ratings have been submitted for this recipe yet.

Rate & Review

Send / Email

What’s News?

Simply Impressive
Luv-a-Duck’s brand new “Simply Impressive” campaign has officially aired.

Dux Kitchen Pop-up
With eight simple recipes, our group of amateur cooks impressed a restaurant full of foodie influencers.

Luv-a-Duck Celebrates 50 Years
In 2018, Luv-a-Duck celebrated 50 years of being an Australian family owned business.

Our Story

Our journey started with a simple love of flavour and family, in Arthur Shoppee's backyard in the 1960's. Today, that same love makes us Australia's leading duck producer.

Employment

Luv-a-Duck is a family owned Australian business that employs people nationally in a variety of roles that assists in the operation of our fully vertically integrated agribusiness. To find out what jobs are available, go to seek.com.au and type in “Luv-a-Duck” under Enter Keyword.

Export

Luv-a-Duck products are featured on 5 star menus from the Middle East, through Asia, to the Pacific Islands.

Newsletter

By subscribing to our newsletter, we hope to draw your attention to exciting new classes, special offers and some more great recipe ideas to inspire your own duck meal ideas.

Frequently Asked Questions

Here you can find answers to some common questions about Luv-a-Duck and our products.


Watch the video: The BEST Duck Ragu Pasta! (December 2021).