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Mendocino County Creates Cannabis Appellations

Mendocino County Creates Cannabis Appellations

In a move that signals a long term investment in the legal marijuana industry, California’s Mendocino County has begun dividing land into specific appellations for cannabis, allowing growers to take advantage of the same regional prestige and promotional power used by vintners to market their wine.

So far, Mendocino has 11 proposed cannabis regions: Spyrock-Bell Springs, Covelo-Dos Rios, Long Valley-Branscomb-Leggett, Willits, Comptche, Ukiah Valley, North Mendocino Coast, South Mendocino Coast, Anderson Valley South Mendocino, Potter Valley, and Mountainhouse South Mendocino County. The goal of the local cannabis growers’ community is to establish the same brand recognition and desirability for cannabis as the term “Napa Valley” has for wine.

Traditionally, the practice of establishing appellations, or protected geographical regions, has been mostly reserved for the wine industry. An appellation designates not only the area where wine grapes were grown and harvested, but also the type of grapes planted, and overall terroir of the product, or the environmental factors that have contributed to its distinct taste profile and characteristics.

Sparkling white wine, for example, can only be called Champagne if it is produced within France’s Champagne wine region, which is legally defined by the European Union.

In Mendocino, cannabis appellations will be used to establish the value of medical marijuana grown in a California county, and make it illegal for producers to mislabel non-California cannabis as such. Though the use of both medical and recreational marijuana remains illegal at the federal level, California is one of a number of individual states to invest in the enormous business potential of legal cannabis.

“Appellations can be really powerful because they can be a means to protect everything from the intellectual property, to the labor force, to the culture and history,” Richard Mendelson, a wine legal expert told the North Bay Business Journal. They can be very rich vehicles for promotion, protection, and rural development. Appellations will help show the legitimacy of what [growers] are doing.”

Since October of last year, when the state redefined cannabis cultivation as a form of agriculture, farmers in Mendocino have been eager to buy dedicated land before larger companies get involved. As in winemaking, the creation of a special “Mendocino Made” certification will also allow growers to establish sustainability standards that will set the local cannabis apart, and perhaps create an industry standard.

At the moment, the California Growers Association, a statewide cannabis advocacy group, is working on creating a process to establish appellations, with more certifications for more California counties to follow. Mendocino farmers are eager to take advantage of potential cannabis tourism, with tours and tasting rooms, just like those offered by established vineyards.

“Like with wine, there are a number of young, serious cannabis entrepreneurs,” Mendelson said. “They want to do things right, they’re proud of their product and they’re doing their research. There’s a whole new breed, just like with the wine industry, the next generation wanting to build their expertise upon what other people have done.”


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.


Cannabis Appellations

For years before we guided weed tours we brought tourists and wine lovers on tours of Northern California wine country, conducting tours of the Sonoma Valley, the Napa Valley, and the Carneros region. These aren’t just beautiful places to visit in northern California. These are examples of appellations. An appellation is defined as a geographical name under which a winegrower is authorized to identify and market their wine.

As all wine lovers know, terroir – the unique combination of soil and climate particular to a specific region makes an enormous difference in the quality and taste of a wine. The same varietal of grapes grown in the Bordeaux valley in France, and in the Sonoma Valley of California will taste completely different from each other, and experienced epicures will be able to tell what region the wine came from just by tasting it. Of course, you don’t have to have the sophisticated palette of a sommelier because the appellation is printed right on the bottle, and appreciators of fine wines will seek out certain appellations that are known for growing the highest quality wines.

Experienced cannasseurs know the same thing, and the boutique cannabis growers of The Emerald Triangle are working to create an appellation system similar to that of wines, so you can tell just by reading the label as well. Once the appellation system is in place, folks will be seeking out Ukiah Valley cannabis the same way they seek out Napa Valley wines, and northern California’s boutique growers will be able to distinguish themselves from massive central valley corporate grow operations.

California already has a very accurate track and trace system for cannabis that tracks every plant from its point of origin as a seedling or clone all the way up to its point of sale, so authentication is already in place.

Enter the CalCannabis Appellations Project, a program of The California Department of Food and Agriculture. Since cannabis became legal in California in 2018, it has been regulated by the CDFA, and on February 20th of 2020 the CDFA proposed regulations for appellations of origin of California cannabis. The CDFA defines an appellation of origin as a protected designation that identifies the geographical origin of a product and how that product was produced. So Appellations aren’t just about where cannabis varietals are grown, but how they’re grown. For instance, appellation designations won’t apply to indoor grown cannabis, but only sungrown cannabis that is grown in the specific terroir of the region of origin. Their stated goals are to promote regional cannabis products and local businesses, prevent the misrepresentation of a cannabis product’s origin, and support consumer confidence about a cannabis product’s origin and characteristics.

Mendocino County has 11 distinct regions designated to be separate appellations, each with its own unique soil and climatic conditions.