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Gluten-Free Diets May Affect Heart Risk, Study Says

Gluten-Free Diets May Affect Heart Risk, Study Says

Unless you have celiac disease, it might be bad for you to avoid bread

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You might as well eat the bread.

Nixing gluten might not be the fix-all health solution many think it is. According to a recent study published in the British Medical Journal, cutting the amount of gluten in your diet could increase your risk of coronary heart disease. The researchers involved recommend ditching the idea that gluten-free diets are better unless you actually have celiac disease.

Going gluten-free can be a real chore — even setting aside how annoying it makes you at restaurants. That stuff is in everything, from beer to barbecue sauce. Yet thousands of Americans have taken on the challenge of living a gluten-free lifestyle under the impression that it will positively impact their health.

Advocates such as David Perlmutter, MD, author of the popular book Grain Brain, have popularized the idea that carbohydrates are “destroying your brain” and “can cause dementia, ADHD, anxiety, chronic headaches, depression, and much more.” But really, the science behind these claims has been under close scrutiny. For patients without a true medical allergy to gluten, the effects may not be as severe or real as these accounts suggest.

This new study seems to be one of the first to propose there may be real health risks associated with eliminating grains and other forms of carbohydrates. The researchers followed over 100,000 people for 26 years; their analysis found that a gluten-free diet did not have any positive effect on lowering heart disease risk. On the contrary, the prevalence of heart disease increased among participants who cut out gluten.

Other studies have shown that diabetes risk increases for those who go gluten-free, as well.

The researchers excluded individuals with celiac disease from the study population — celiac is a genuine and very serious gluten intolerance, and those diagnosed with it obviously should avoid gluten. Luckily, things are getting better for this unfortunate segment of the population — but for the rest of the world, there’s no good reason to live a life deprived of great garlic bread.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.


A New Study Says Eating A Gluten-Free Diet Is Bad For Your Heart

The gluten-free movement is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The industry is worth more than $10 billion dollars, with celebrities like Miley Cyrus endorsing gluten-free living and eating regimes like the Paleo Diet and Whole30 describing gluten with such vitriol it might as well be radium. But science says unless you actually have celiac disease (or a gluten allergy), your health will suffer if you skip it.

First things first: Only about 1 percent of Americans actually have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten that can lead to gastrointestinal and joint issues. But, despite the relative infrequency of actual gluten-processing disorders, the gluten-free diet is “the most popular in Hollywood,” according to Dr. Alessio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment at Massachusetts General Hospital, who has led highly regarded gluten research.

And now a study says cutting gluten from your life could be bad news for your heart health. The massive study followed 100,000 people from 1986 to 2010. The participants had no history of heart disease, and were asked to fill out food questionnaires every four years.

When scientists analyzed their health based on gluten intake, no “significant” link between eating gluten and risk of heart disease appeared. But when the team analyzed the data from the perspective of refined grains, the findings were completely different.

“It appeared that those individuals who consumed the lowest levels of dietary gluten had a 15 percent higher risk of heart disease,” study leader Andrew Chan, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, told CBS.

Basically, the study says that removing gluten from your diet can spell heart problems later in life. This is because whole grains that contain gluten like barley, wheat and rye are full of healthy dietary fiber that is good for your heart.

“The avoidance of gluten may result in reduced consumption of beneficial whole grains, which may affect cardiovascular risk,” the study authors write in BMJ. “The promotion of gluten-free diets among people without celiac disease should not be encouraged.”

But what if you really do have celiac disease? Are you doomed? Definitely not, researchers say. Just make sure your diet is rich in gluten-free sources of dietary fiber. Quinoa, oats and brown rice are three excellent options to make sure you—and your heart—are healthy.